Artworks by Karl Bauer

Karl Konrad Friedrich Bauer (1868–1942) was a German artist, print-maker and poet. He was an expert draftsmanship, and in the early 20th century he found a good deal of success as an illustrator and portrait artist. Because of his traditional style, he was more than welcome to continue working in the arts when the National Socialists came to power, even receiving the Goethe Medal for Art and Science. Before he died during a visit to Munich in 1942, Karl completed a number of portraits of Adolf Hitler, as well as leaders and heroes of the Third Reich.

karl-bauer-adolf-hitler.jpg

Adolf Hitler

karl-bauer-albert-leo-schlageter.jpg

Albert Leo Schlageter

karl-bauer-horst-wessel.jpg

Horst Wessel

karl-bauer-ministerpraesident-goering.jpg

Ministerpräsident Göring

karl-bauer-reichsarbeitsminister-seldte.jpg

Reichsarbeitsminister Seldte

karl-bauer-reichsjugendfuehrer-baldur-von-schirach.jpg

Reichsjugendführer Baldur von Schirach

karl-bauer-reichsminister-darre.jpg

Reichsminister Darré

karl-bauer-reichsminister-dr-goebbels

Reichsminister Dr. Goebbels

karl-bauer-reichspraesident-v-hindenburg.jpg

Reichspräsident v. Hindenburg

karl-bauer-reichsstatthalter-general-ritter-von-epp.jpg

Reichsstatthalter General Ritter von Epp

Published in: on August 20, 2017 at 6:31 pm  Leave a Comment  

Nationalists Take to the Streets of Berlin on the 30th Anniversary of Murder of Rudolf Hess

berlin-hess-rally.jpg

National Socialists marched in the streets of Berlin as antifascist counterprotesters assembled to meet them.

Helmeted police in riot gear stood guard as nationalist demonstrators converged on the German capital to mark the 30th anniversary of the murder of Rudolf Hess, Adolf Hitler’s deputy.

About 500 people on each side turned out, police said.

Convicted at the Nuremberg war crimes trials, Hess served a life sentence at Spandau Prison and was the sole inmate there from 1966 until his death in 1987.

Hess Rally.jpg

National Socialist sympathizers revere Hess because he never renounced his beliefs decades after the fall of the Third Reich.

One of rally banners read, “I do not regret anything,” Hess’ last words before his sentencing at Nuremberg. Another banner disputed the account that Hess committed suicide at age 93: “It was murder. Enough with the suicide lie.”

arrested Hess rally.jpg

Forged in the ashes of World War II, strict laws in Germany ban ancient National Socialist symbols and free speech.

Rally organizers told demonstrators not to play marching music and to walk silently to the site of Spandau Prison, razed after Hess’ death. Every 25th person could carry an imperial German flag. They were not allowed to wear NS attire and display a swastika.

Funereal music played from a truck as the patriotic demonstrators marched to the prison site.

Anti-fascist counterprotesters chanted “war criminal” at demonstrators, shouted “all Berlin hates the police” and advanced toward officers.

Residents played loud music from balconies countering the demonstrators, such as a Michael Jackson song declaring, “It don’t matter if you’re black or white.”

A negroid woman held up a sign with a heart, prompting native german youth to shout “go home.” She replied, “Berlin is my home.”

In contrast with the restrictions in Germany, US law protects the right of patriots, white nationalist, the Ku Klux Klan and other white rights groups to hold public rallies and express their views openly.

5998a87814086.image

Rudolf_Hess-Gedenkmarsch.jpg

Published in: on August 20, 2017 at 6:11 pm  Leave a Comment