The Eagle Once The Horst Wessel

eagle-HW1

Amazing synchronicity how certain symbols come to be revealed at certain times by certain people. The Ghost Ship returns, this is a beautiful example of what a Ghost Ship is, it is something that endures, with no adequate rational explanation, other then to remind one of something that has been lost, it travels deep within one’s own rare blood, only a few will see it, but when they see it they see the beauty of it, like this NAZI Ghost ship of the seas, when seen it also spells Doom, as we say “The Ghost in a false reality is real”, here is an example of El Caleuche, USCGC Eagle/Horst Wessel- Karl Young

Segelschulschiff "Horst Wessel"

USCGC Eagle (WIX-327), formerly the Horst Wessel and also known as the Barque Eagle, is a 295-foot (90 m) barque used as a training cutter for future officers of the United States Coast Guard. She is the only active commissioned sailing vessel in U.S. military service, and one of only two commissioned sailing vessels, along with USS Constitution

Each summer, Eagle deploys with cadets from the United States Coast Guard Academy and candidates from the Officer Candidate School for periods ranging from a week to two months. These voyages fulfill multiple roles. The primary mission is training the cadets and officer candidates, but the ship also performs a public relations role for the Coast Guard and the United States. Often, Eagle makes calls at foreign ports as a goodwill ambassador.

The ship was built as the German sail training ship Horst Wessel in 1936; it served to train German sailors in sail techniques until decommissioned at the start of World War II. The vessel was given anti-aircraft armament and re-commissioned in 1942. At the end of the war, Horst Wessel was taken by the U.S. as war reparations.

brass plate HW

Eagle commenced its existence in  Germany as Horst Wessel, a ship of the Gorch Fock class. Horst Wessel was an improvement on the original design. She was larger in dimension and her spars were all steel, unlike Gorch Focks wooden yards. SSS Horst Wessel began life as Schiff (“ship”) 508 at Blohm & Voss in Hamburg, Germany in 1936.Her keel was laid on 15 February, she was launched on 13 June, completed on 16 September, and commissioned on 17 September. She was the second ship in the class to be built, following the class namesake Gorch FockRudolf Hess gave the speech at her launch in the presence of Adolf Hitler, and Horst Wessel’s mother christened the new ship with a bottle of champagne. The name was given in tribute to SA leader Horst Wessel, who had been accorded martyr status by the NSDAP.  He also wrote the song which came to be known as “Horst-Wessel-Lied” or”Die Fahne hoch” (“The Flag on High”) , which was later used as the NSDAP national anthem. Shortly after work began on Horst Wessel, the Blohm & Voss shipyard laid the keel of the German battleship Bismarck, which was labeled Schiff 509.

Horst-Wessel-1937-HWI02

SSS Horst Wessel served as the flagship of the Kriegsmarine sail training fleet, which consisted of Gorch FockAlbert Leo Schlageter, and Horst Wessel. (Mircea was also built in 1937 for the Romanian Navy, and work began on a fifth ship called Herbert Norkus, but was stopped with the outbreak of war.) Horst Wessel was commanded by Captain August Thiele, a previous Captain of Gorch Fock, and it was homeported in Kiel. In the three years before World War II, she undertook numerous training cruises in the North Atlantic waters, sailing with trainee groups consisting of both future officers and future petty officers. On 21 August 1938, Adolf Hitler visited the ship and sailed for approximately one hour before departing. Later that year, Horst Wessel and Albert Leo Schlageter undertook a four-month voyage to the Caribbean and visited St. Thomas and Venezuela. Along the way, they caught numerous sharks and turtles at sea and kept ducks enclosed on deck to provide fresh eggs.

Horst Wessel was decommissioned in 1939 with the onset of World War II, but served as a docked training ship in Stralsund for the marine branch of the Hitler Youth until her recommissioning as an active Navy sail training vessel in 1942. Numerous weapons were installed throughout the decks, including two 20 mm anti-aircraft guns on the bridgewings, two on the foredeck, and two 20 mm Flakvierling quad mounts on the waist. From late 1942 through early 1945, she sailed on numerous training deployments in the Baltic sea with cadets fresh out of basic training. On 14 November 1944, accompanied by Albert Leo SchlageterHorst Wessel was sailing in rough weather, when, near the island of RügenAlbert Leo Schlageter hit a mine that caused extensive damage to its starboard bow. Horst Wessel took Albert Leo Schlageter in a stern tow to keep her from running aground until larger ships could arrive the next day to assist.

Horst Wessel in front of Naval Academy Mürwik in Flensburg in 1937.

In April 1945, after the last German cadet class had departed, Horst Wessel departed Rügen with a group of German refugees on board. She sailed to Flensburg where Captain Barthold Schnibbe surrendered to the British, and the ship ran up the Union JackHorst Wessel was ordered to Bremerhaven and tied to a temporary pier, and much of its equipment was stripped. At the end of World War II, the four German sailing vessels then extant were distributed to various nations as war reparations. Horst Wessel was won by the United States in a drawing of lots with the Soviet and British navies, and requested by the United States Coast Guard Academy’s Superintendent. On 15 May 1946, she was commissioned by Captain Gordon McGowan into the United States Coast Guard as the U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Eagle. In June 1946, a U.S. Coast Guard crew sailed her from Bremerhaven to Orangeburg, New York—through a hurricane—assisted by Captain Schnibbe and many of his crew who were still aboard. The German volunteer crew was disembarked at Camp Shanks and Eagle proceeded to her new home port of New London, Connecticut.

crew

 

 

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Published in: on August 10, 2018 at 6:11 pm  Comments (3)  

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3 CommentsLeave a comment

  1. Wessel Vessel

  2. LOL, yes!

  3. Very nice Adolf-Ship…Thanks the USA for the good care!
    I se it in Monaco
    Greatings Gitte BalgoCôte d’Azur
    https://balgoarts.de.tl/%2A-MER-%2A-MEER.htm


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